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. >> twenty-five years ago the u.s. and the soviet union signed a treaty which removed thousands of nuclear missiles from europe. former reagan administration officials talk about the negotiations that led to the intermediate nuclear forces treaty. at this event hosted by the american foreign service association, it's an hour 20 minutes. >> okay. i think we're ready to go. i would invite everyone to take their seats. i'd like to wish all a very good morning. i'm susan johnson, the president of afsa, and i'd like to extend a very warm afsa welcome to you all, and thank you for coming to this important and special panel discussion, and also celebration of the 25th anniversary of the signing the inf treaty. special thanks of course go to our panelists and our moderator, and i should not talk, ridgway and burt, for sharing their experiences and reflections surrounding the conflict negotiations that led to this treaty which was a significant factor in reducing danger of the cold war. i'm sure you know all of these three eminent folks, but i would just like to say a quick word. ambassador rozanne
or the terrible things that were done in the name of the soviet union under the leadership. i think it's important to factor in, but look at the broad sweep of the history of the relationship with the soviet union beginning in 1917 and 1918 when the first sent the troops into the soviet union as part of a broad counterrevolutionary force led by the british and then the united states refusal to recognize the soviet union until 1933 under roosevelt, and then during the 30's the soviet union was pushing very hard for international consensus and trying to stop hitler and they were leading the antifascist force globally coming and the calculus party was instrumental and they had to have a movement in the united states from that. but during the war after germany attacks the soviet union in 1941 the united states and the british decided they are going to support the soviet union because it is the key to the chance of surviving the war during the soviets and to keep the soviets in the war. they were caught so off guard that they were concerned and the soviets are going to capitulate that but they offer se
or the terrible things that were done in the name of the soviet union under stalin's leadership. i think that's important a factor in that if you look at the broad history of the united states relationship with the soviet union beginning in 1917 and 1918 when the united states first sent troops into the soviet union as part of a broader counterrevolutionary force led by the british, then the united states to refusal to recognize the soviet union until 1933 under roosevelt, and then in the 30s the soviet union was pushing very hard for international consensus and trying to stop hitler. that led to anti-fascist forces globally in the communist in the anti-fascist movement in the united states after that but during the war after germany attacked the soviet union in 1941, then the united states and the british decide that it's important for the soviet union is to keep the soviets in the war. they were caught so offguard that the british were concerned that the soviets would capitulate at that point that the united states offers several things. the soviets made several demands and they promise mat
sweep of the history of the united states' relationship with the soviet union, beginning in 1917-1918, when the united states first went to the soviet union, as part of a broader force led by the british, and then then united states' refusal to recognize the soviet union until 1933 under roosevelt, and then during the 30s, the soviet union was pushing very hard for international consensus, and trying to stop hitler and they were beating bet antifast cysts, -- antifascists, and then the united states and the british decide they're going to support the soviet union because it's key to the chance office surviving the war, keep the soviets in the war. so the british were concerned that the soviets were going to capitulate. so the united states offers several things and the soviets make several demands and the united states proms material, and the united states has trouble delivering that for the first couple of years. stalin says if you give us airplanes and the other equipment we need, we can stay in the war. the united states tries, and other people are not as sincere in providing
. somewhere among 25 went to soviet union. during the entire war, less than 2% went to china. so you see, china was very important, but in terms of material support was very small. that was very ironic. has lot to do with rivalry, policy, priorities, logistical difficulties. but overall it's national policy, very important. the time he of course doesn't work the chinese way because americans don't decide to go back to asia. >> how many chinese died during world war ii? >> the numbers vary. the most accepted number during the seven years, eight years of war, remember world war ii lasted a lot longer in china, was 15 million. >> 15 million? >> 50 million. >> that's on par or close to what the soviet union lost? >> soviet union lost more. anymore concentrated way because stalin -- german policy and eastern front, the other area. >> japan lost -- >> most of these 50 million casualties were civilians in china. so that's the accepted number. >> maochun yu, professor, what do you teach your at the naval academy speak with i teach mostly military history, world war ii, and modern china, east asi
, collapse of the soviet union, the chief lifeline for so many. you see the expansion of the democracy itself. and so from the period of 1974 to about 2005 was a moment of tremendous democratic growth. but then i say 2005 because since 2005, we've seen a decline in political pluralism around the world. six consecutive years that has but i wanted to do this book was examined by that wise. unless you find is that these regimes understand that in a more globally interconnected world that the past forms of coercion can no longer be the blood tools that were so familiar from the 20th century. but think of mouse resolution or campaign, stalin's gulag, killing fields. now it's actually a much more subtle form of repression that are used by these regimes and they are refashioning dictatorship for a modern age. so that's the main thrust. and every country traveled to come i always meet with two groups of people. i meet with people serving the regime come is serving a dictator, political advisors i.d. labs, karami's and also his meeting with people trying to offend appeared at his meeting with the stu
about this period right after world war ii, because it was a time the soviet union had reached a height, there was an apotheosis of stalinism. it was reinforced by the experience of the war. by 1945, it was a fully developed system with an economic theory and a clear ideology, and it was at this moment the red army marched into central europe and began imposing that system on the central european states, so you can see how from scratch -- what did the soviets think their system was? what did they think was important, and how did they try to carry it out? >> where did they get to right to march into eastern europe? >> they were the victors of the war. hitler had invaded germany in 1941, and they fought back against the germans, and they kept going against berlin. >> define stalinism. >> stalinism was a developed system of control. it believed it could control everything, not only in politics and economics but social life, civic life, sports clubs and chess clubs. in the stalinist system, there were no independent institutions of any kind. no independent voices of any kind were allowed to
novels and the memory that we used to hate and fear and know very little about the soviet union. but there are remnants of the cold war that are fully alive and that matter a ton in the most dangerous place on the planet right now. that story's coming up. watchinv even better. if your tv were a hot dog, zeebox would be some sort of fancy, french mustard. just like adding fancy mustard to a hotdog makes you go "woah!," zeebox adds video, info, and playalongs to spice up your favorite shows. download zeebox free and say "woah" every time you watch tv. to spice up your favorite shows. try running four.ning a restaurant is hard, fortunately we've got ink. it gives us 5x the rewards on our internet, phone charges and cable, plus at office supply stores. rewards we put right back into our business. this is the only thing we've ever wanted to do and ink helps us do it. make your mark with ink from chase. >>> the u.s. has military bases all over the world, right? our military is everywhere. the army recruiting website right now, the page on where might i end up serving if i signed up? i
little about the soviet union. but there are remnants of the cold war that are fully alive and that matter a ton in the most dangerous place on the planet right now. that story's coming up. yo, give it up, dude! up high! ok. don't you have any usefull apps on that thing? who do you think i am, quicken loans? ♪ at quicken loans, our amazingly useful mortgage calculator app allows you to quickly calculate your mortgage payment based on today's incredibly low interest rates... right from your iphone or android smartphone. one more way quicken loans is engineered to amaze. ♪ [ sniffs ] i took dayquil but my nose is still runny. [ male announcer ] truth is, dayquil doesn't treat that. really? [ male announcer ] alka-seltzer plus fights your worst cold symptoms, plus it relieves your runny nose. [ breathes deeply ] awesome. [ male announcer ] yes, it is. that's the cold truth! >>> the u.s. has military bases all over the world, right? our military is everywhere. the army recruiting website right now, the page on where might i end up serving if i signed up? it has a rollover m
for the inspiration of the trip at 9:00 p.m. eastern. [bells rings] >> twenty five years ago the u.s. and soviet union signed a treat dwhrai removed thousand of nuclear i missiles from europe. that recount. the discussion was hosted by the american foreign services association. it's an hour and twenty minutes. [inaudible conversations] >> okay. i think we're ready to go. i wouldn't like -- i would like to invite everyone to take their seat. i would like to wish you a good morning. i'm susan johnson. the president. and i would like to extend a warm welcome to you all. and thank you for coming to this important and special panel discussion and also celebration of the 25th anniversary of the signing of the historic imf treaty. special thanks, of course, go to our panelists, and our moderator ambassadors for sharing their experience and reflectioning surrounding the come flex negotiations that lead to the treaty which was a significant factor in reducing the tension and dangers of the cold war. and i'm sure you know all of these three imminent folk, i would like to say a quick word. ambassador ridgeway wa
's lurch to the left and its inability to view the soviet union objectively and to concede that it was a clear and present danger. the case demonstrated the intimate connection between communism and liberalism, quote, when i took out my little fling and aimed at communism, chambers wrote in "witness," i also did something else. what i hit was the forces of that great socialist revolution which in the name of liberalism is been inching its ice cap. the one x liberal who saw the connection clearly was president ronald reagan. who awarded the medal of freedom. asked why, mr. reagan replied, 100 years ago people will ever forgotten the details but i want them to remember that out his went to jail as a traitor and whitaker chambers was honored by his fellow citizens. his conviction verify anti communism as a potent element of american politics. it gave bill buckley and other and other conservative they caused by which to unite traditional conservatives and libertarians against the common enemy, liberalism. historian george nash and others argued persuasively that without any com
, soviet documents, documents of the former soviet union have become available to researchers. the soviets played a pivotal war in the 1967 war. they precipitated the crisis. i was able to go to moscow and access some of these documents. there's been a new opening in two of the three major arab participants in the war. in jordan and in egypt, there's a tremendous wave of publications about the war, phepl oeurs, studies, even the release of certain documents which is rare in the arab world about 1967. the only place this has not occurred is in syria. in syria, officially the war never occurred. there is not one single official book -- and all books in syria are official -- about the 1967 war. how the average syria believes israel came into possession of the golan heights is a mystery to me. >> you were born where? >> i was born in the tiny town in upstate new york but raised in new jersey. >> when did you first go to israel? >> i first went when i was 15. i went to work on a farm. i worked in alfalfa, i worked in the cows, i became a cowboy. i was a lousy farmer. i went and studied history.
boomers 15 years away from retiring and i don't have the luxury of the soviet union falling. the recipes that worked in the late 1990's worked. they don't work now. we have a different set of problems. host: from new york city, democrat blind, go ahead. caller: thank you for taking my call. even if we go over the fiscal cliff, we need a bigger plan because it does not even balance the budget. i don't think we really have a supply-side problem. they talk about cutting taxes on the right and i think there are so many people out of work and i think you need to get these people to work. i just think we have a demand issue, not a supply issue. if you're out of work, you cannot pay taxes. guest: he is exactly right -- no one is talking about a fiscal cliff that will solve the problem. there is no grand bargain being discussed except in the most general outline terms. there is enough to be -- nothing close to being politically acceptable. we're only talking of something of that will allow people to get through this. in the short term, we need to have fiscal policy that may get the deficit highe
was the beginning of the coup d'État, the soviet union. the cia spy plane was shot down over russia. the cia had suppressed a study showing the soviet antiaircraft missiles can now climb high enough to reach the u2, atlanta ike to believe the pilot would never be captured into a dive on the plane broke up or killed himself with a suicide pill. the russians captured the pilot, powers, khrushchev bloated and credit of the wicked american spies. that was the and. eisenhower was very depressed. i want to resign, he said his faithful assistant, when he came into the oval office after powers was captured and his cover story blown. ike bounced back. he always did, but after nearly eight years of constant attention he was exhausted. ike threatened to use nuclear weapons. he never told anyone whether he actually would use them. he could not, of course or his threat would no longer be credible. talk about the loneliness. ike me all about the burden, from the north african campaign in 1943 to d-day to the conquest of germany, and the liberation of europe. ike smoke four packs a day as a general. he quit co
of communism substantiated then by the evil empire of the soviet union and the west, in his purgatory letter to his children, which had been mentioned already, chambers said that in communism he saw the concentrated evil of our time. now, he looked with kindred eyes upon the enormity of communism. indeed, conservatives of all stripes could agree about that hideous this of the communist system, which is why the world of the cold war was, in many ways, a tidier, more manichean world than the one that we inhabit. whatever else might be said about it, the soviet union provided a sort of negative rallying point, something that conservatives of all sorts could define themselves against, and i wonder about today, what about today, how do conservatives to find themselves. well, that is a question that i hope the panel is going to conjure with. before i turn things over to them, i want to make just briefly to final points. one of which is -- has been raised a couple of times. if conservatives were virtually at one in regarding the freedom biking etiology of parmesan with repugnance, they were not, i
? the soviet union assumed all of it was closed and nobody would ever have access. what worries we are returning to that kind of attitude. it is not just let's wait until everybody is dead and then we can talk about it, but nobody is ever going to have access to it. it is secret, and the truth does not get out. >> why do they keep it there if they are never going to let it out? >> the kgb writes its own books. in writes its own histories -- should say, wrote its own descriptions and kept them inside its building. they are interested in their own history. >> how do we deal with the world of openness when it comes to archives? but the u.s. is better than many european countries. many u.s. archives are easier to use. cia archives are harder to use the avaya and i would argue they could be more open, particularly older ones. that can all be done, but the national archives and -- i actually have not worked in it, but friends i know is easy. >> go back to when you started this book in 1944, and it goes to 1956. how did the soviets take over eastern europe? what did they use? you mentione
, and said, how can it be the head of the soviet union dies, and we have no contingency plan. it was criminal, said the president. the truth was the united states and the other western nations had very little idea of what was happening behind the iron curtain. two years later at the first summit meeting of the cold war era at geneva in 1955, the united states still did not know who was running the soviet union. they sent four leaders, one tall white man in a white suit with a white goatee who looked like colonel sanders from kentucky fried chicken, clearly, a figure head. the head of the red army, ike's ally in defeating the nazis in world war ii. eisenhower spent his son, john, to do some spying. subdued and shaken, just whispered, "things are not as they seem." presidentize -- president eisenhower found out who was in charge on the fifth day of the conference. the big pier of the nuclear age was a surprise attack. proposed each country allow the other country's reconnaissance plane to fly overhead to detect preparations for a sneak attack. the soviet delegation initially seemed to like the
, because it was a time the soviet union had reached a height, there was an apotheosis of stalinism. it was reinforced by the experience of the war. by 1945, it was a fully developed system with an economic theory and a clear ideology, and it was at this moment the red army marched into central europe and began imposing that system on the central european states, so you can see how from scratch -- what did the soviets think their system was? what did they think was important, and how did they try to carry it out? >> where did they get to right to march into eastern europe? >> they were the victors of the war. hitler had invaded germany in 1941, and they fought back against the germans, and they kept going against berlin. >> the fine stalinism. >> stalinism was developed system,-- define stalinism. >> stalinism was a developed system of control. it believed it could control everything, not only in politics and economics but social life, civic life, sports clubs and chess clubs. in the stalinist system, there were no independent institutions of any kind. no independent voices of any k
for its nightlife and its beautiful women. under the old soviet union, it was a center of organized crime. now odessa has become a major hub for the global sex trade. women are lured to the port of odessa from all over the struggling countries of eastern europe with promises of badly- needed work abroad. many are unaware of what the traffickers have in store. the production team has set up cameras here. >> we knew that if we wanted to get inside the story that we had to be in a place where it was so prevalent that everybody would have an example or know people who were trafficked. and that's what brought us ultimately to odessa. >> narrator: frustrated with an inability to chase the traffickers overseas, the ukrainian secret service has given us a tip about a suspected sex trader who regularly brings girls through here. across from the port, on the famous odessa steps, we secretly film as she traffics young women to turkey. we've been asked to call her olga. >> the secret service said that she runs a legitimate business as a cover, and she basically takes women from moldova and ukraine to
reagan officials reflected on the 1987 negotiations on a nuclear missile treaty with the soviet union. the intermediate nuclear forces treaty, or inf, led to the destruction of thousands of europe-based nuclear missiles on both sides. speakers here will include former assistant secretary of state richard burt, former u.s. ambassador to the soviet union, jack matlock, and will also there from former assistant secretary of state rozanne ridgway. the american foreign service association posted this hour and 20 minute event. >> i would like to wish all other good morning. one. i'm susan johnson, the president and i would like to extend a very warm welcome to you all. and thank you for coming to this important and special panel discussion. and also celebration of the 25th anniversary of the signing of the historic treaty. special thanks of course go to our panelists and our moderator, ambassadors matlock, ridgeway and bert, for sharing their experiences and reflections surrounded the complex negotiations that led to this treaty which was a significant factor in reducing dangers of the cold
a different decision al type structure. >> yes. >> rose: from russia, and the soviet union from going into europe once again, deterrence is mutually assured destruction. and so then, does the question of value and life, different because of a culture that can produce suicide bombers mean that there -- means that will not work in the end or do you say no nationable and the leadership of no nation would ever, ever bargain initiate an action that assured their own destruction? >> well, one thing about the iranian leaders that they have in common with the leaders of terrorist groups like bin laden, they are not strapping on the suicide bombs, they are very willing to see young people and handicapped people and so on strap these things on, but their lives mean a lot to them, and that is something in our hip pocket it seems to me. they want to stay alive and they want to stay in power. >> rose: i want to talk about that. one quick question about what you believe with respect to iran. you believe that an attack by rael will be a terrible thing to happen, because it would only delay the inevi
denying that the soviet union ever killed nebraska? he wrote a book called "crus chef lied," and lied in the speech. you know, he didn't own up to much in the secret speech, but it was a block buster speech, but he didn't own up to all that much, and here's a guy, an academic freedom, blah, blah, blah -- [laughter] let me ask you, would we have a holocaust with the fault -- really? i wonder. the aforementioned bob said this was in an interview with me a few years ago that in the academy there's a feeling of don't let's be too rude to stalin. he was a bad guy, yes, but the americans were bad guys too and so was the british empire. eric die the, and apologist for communism and stalin. bob, who told the truth about the soviet union won a degree from a university run by, a sadly corrupt president, i believe, who admired bob. that says something about academia and the world. did you see the poster the e.u.? showing all the symbols of europe? it showed a cross, star of david, crescent and so on, and a hammer and cycle. there was a bit -- there's an outcry from the lit wanians, and why aren'
, germany, the u.s., of course, even the soviet union. >> -- tavis: that is my point. everybody seems to be guilty of that over the course of history. i am glad you took a question. what does africa have today that the rest of the world does not prove >> -- does not? >> some possibilities. some structures of spirituality, and i emphasize that, spirituality which is not aggressive. decimating a culture, which christianity is guilty of. islam is guilty of. a tolerant spirituality. in the new world, in brazil, where african religions co have it and become -- where they cohabit. this is a lesson for some of the so-called world religions. they have taken joy in decimating humanity tavis: -- and decimating humanity. tavis: i raise this question. just like china, the world power now advancing in africa, the catholic church has found africa is a place that is very fertile. what say you about the catholic church all of that continent? they are getting new converts daily, hourly. >> a bit more selectivity or control. who is going to argue about the ultimate fundamental? you have a contest for t
of these missiles in cuba. the concern was if we were to attack and try to have a strike, that the soviet union would then feel emboldened to take over berlin. berlin had been very much -- they were really the issue that was most of greatest concern to president kennedy. and he felt that the soviet union would've felt that they were justified in doing so he but they couldn't have a western presence with missiles pointed so close to them. if we could not tolerated in our neck of the woods, they would not tolerate it in there. so throughout the crisis -- i mean, one thing i would recommend is that people not read this before you go to bed and have casual discussions about nuclear war, which may keep you up. but it is very sobering. but that is the backdrop. >> is to elaborate a little bit more, doesn't this help us understand that there were people -- we always knew about adlai stevenson. before this, i never realized that harry lovett fort erie truman and george bundy, the president's national security adviser, thought that berlin was so important that that was why they urged him not to attack o
a jolt to the soviet union so athe time, this didn't seem so outlandish. >> fire. >> just think of what a nuclear explosion would look like up there. the u.s. government once considered it. cnn has documents and interviewed the leader of a once secret air force project titled a study of lunar research flights, with a just as low brow nickname, project a-119. what was it really? >> to evaluate the value of putting a small, emphasize small in this world anyhow, nuclear explosion on the moon. >> reporter: physicist leonard rifle, now 85 years old, led the project in 1958. it was the height of the cold war. america and the soviet union were in a nuclear arms race. the soviets 4 h just launched the first satellite, sputnik, and were ahead in the space race. u.s. officials needed a big splash. >> in comparison, the united states feared -- was feared to be looking puny, so this was a concept to sort of reassure people that the united states could maintain a mutually assured deterrence and therefore avoid any huge conflagration on earth. >> reporter: according to rifle's declassified report on
haven't gone up. explosion of health care costs and it makes it worse. like the soviet union. the food was free but you couldn't get any. >> all of the chaos with the sea of exchanges and business levels. you can have washington d.c. stepping in and more federal innervention than we have right now . with all of the stuff. pet projects and in a way to help victims of super storm sandy. >> live from america's news headquarters. i am kelly wright. an american marine is back on american soil after being released from prison. the judge released john hammar last night after ruling gance his weapon's chargings. this is a picture of him locked up shackled to a bed. he was arrested when he was driving across the border with an hireloom gun. >> this is a baby, rolling away in a shopping cart anded hading to a busy street. the police officer was at the right place at the right time and helped to save the child. the wisconsin police said the baby's mother placed the other child in the car and the shopping cart took off . it was a big scare but no injuries. here we go again. a bill intended to aid
't gone up. explosion of health care costs and it makes it worse. like the soviet union. the food was free but you couldn't get any. >> all of the chaos with the sea of exchanges and business levels. you can have washington d.c. stepping in and more federal innervention than we have right now . with all of the stuff. pet projects and in a way to help victims of super storm sandy. was a big scare but no injuries. here we go again. a bill intended to aid super storm sandy victims . this has spending hawks peeves. explain your flip side. >> i have no problem but i will say it is more important to thwart than haggle in congress. i live in loir manhattan and we have seen problems with super storm sandy. we have businesses that are close not reopening and this is happening in areas hit by the storm. the vital thing is to get the money flowing and more important than congress hagsling. snurkswe need to swallow pork to get what we need. >> no, we don't. you look at sandy spending bill if dc got hit and not new york or new jersey . two weeks after cat can the hit the new orleans area. that area got
i took 1 hours 99 the former soviet union. these are blown up to a gigantic images. they lose resolution. i do not mind that, because my images are about the images, but they're also about the idea, which is why there is text all over the entire surface. >> marie in moved into the mansion on powell street just five years ago. its galleries are housed in one of the very rare single family residences around union square. for the 100th anniversary of the mansion, meridian hosted a series of special events, including a world premiere reading by lawrence ferlinghetti. >> the birth of an american corporate fascism, the next to last free states radio, the next-to-last independent newspaper raising hell, the next-to-last independent bookstore with a mind of its own, the next to last leftie looking for obama nirvana. [laughter] the first day of the wall street occupation set forth upon this continent a new revolutionary nation. [applause] >> in addition to its own programming as -- of artist talks, meridian has been a downtown host for san francisco states well-known port trees center.
the soviet union was then had reached a kind of height. there was a sort of -- of stalinism and stalinism was created throughouthroughou t the 1920s and 30s and then it was reinforced by the experience of the war. by 1945, it was a fully developed system with a clinical theory and an economic theory and a clear ideology. it was exactly at this moment when the red army marched into central europe and began imposing a system on the central european stage. you can see how from scratch, what did the soviets think their system was? what did they think was important to do first and how did they try to. c-span: where did they get the rights to march into eastern europe? >> guest: they were the victors in the war. hitler had invaded germany in 1941 and a font back against the germans and they kept going to berlin. c-span: defines stalinism. >> guest: stalinism was a developed system as i say in it was a system of complete control. the stalinist state believed he could control everything. he could control not only politics and not only economics but it could control social life and it could contro
of its people. the soviet union began to relax its restrictions on jewish emigration in 1987 during gorbachev's perestroika. then following the collapse of the soviet union in 1991, millions of soviet jews were permitted to leave. since then, russia has allowed free emigration. i have felt for a long time that we should have graduated russia from jackson-vanik when jackson-vanik's noble purpose was achieved rather than waiting years, often in the effort to make other points relative to russia on other issues. first some history. in 2007, i met with rabbi lazar, chief rabbi of russia regarding jackson-vanik. he urged passage of legislation ending the application of jackson-vanik to russia. also in 2007, i received a letter from the chairman of the federation of jewish communities which represents presidents and rabbis of over 200 jewish communities in russia, a letter which urged me to work to graduate russia from the jackson-vanik amendment in view of the fact that its goals had already been met. part of his letter reads as follows -- quote -- "we're thankful for all your efforts to
is at stake and the concern was if we were to attack and have a strike the soviet union would feel emboldened to take over berlin. it was the issue of greatest concern. he felt the soviet union felt they were justified. they could not have day western presence. if we could not tolerate in our neck of the woods they would not tolerate in there's. throughout the crisis, to not read this before you go to bet. the casual discussion of nuclear war will keep you up. it is very sobering. >> host: to elaborate tease four . . however it is not known what was not at the time that the russians, there were 40,000 russian troops in cuba, not 8000. >> and there were actual warheads. >> they have tactical nuclear weapons, they have a short-range nuclear weapons that would have wiped out america on the beaches and about 100,000 men had gathered in florida and we might have had a total number of deaths as the vietnam war. in a couple of days after the invasion of cuba and the nuclear exchange following that in europe and around the world, so thank god president kennedy was thinking three or four steps ahead o
process, play? as the soviet union teetered toward an end to? >> i am not sure it had that much direct effect. i would say that ending the arms race, because this was the beginning of ending the arms race and you know it really took the s.t.a.r.t. treaty and a series of others to do so, and it took the liberation of eastern europe and, which went as a separate process. but, i would say that these things actually freed up gorbachev to try to reform the system. it took the pressure off of him. as long as we had the arms race, they had an excuse not for changing the system, but once you and the cold war, not just the arms race, and gorbachev ended it ideologically december 7, 1988, today is also an anniversary of that -- exactly a year after he signed the inf treaty, what he ended in that speech aside from announcing unilateral reductions in their military, was he discarded the class struggle as the rationale for soviet foreign-policy. that was the rationale that also cut the khan eunice party as the dictatorship in the country. so the end of the cold war reforms that gorbachev started th
of china and the soviet union to demonstrate long-range ballistic missile technology, and it is a country that has a horrible proliferation record. this is not just a problem associated with north korean on the peninsula. it has broader ramifications. >> thank you for coming in. very interesting. russian president vladimir putin has warned against foreign intervention in russian politics a. in its first speech to parliament, he also said russia needed to reverse its population decline or fall apart. daniel sandford reports. [speaking russian] >> showing few signs of recent back problems, vladimir putin strolled into one of the great halls of the kremlin for a speech that cements a new era of his leadership, and he suggests head upon the need to address russian population decline, a loss of more than 7 million people in just 20 years. >> of russia wants to be sovereign and power, there needs to be more of us, and we need to be better. >> this has been a difficult year for him with hundred thousand -- with hundreds of thousands of protesters taking to the streets to challenge his leadership
and the soviet unions with the other. weate in silence. the madam took hot long showers because i heard water rushing in the pipes and whether i turned mine on found it cold. a yellow square in the courtiard into the night. i watched for a shadow or shape. rigging a motorcycle mirror on a string and dangled it on a fishing lure and failed. i skulted in the hall way in the gallery and street hoping to catch her there. it only upset my father. we spoke german to each other as a nervous joke. i tinkered with the motorcycle mirror a started lifting bar bells. for a month mother talked of the germany refugee question and asked if it was better for jews to go to the philippines or the dominican republic. pius 11th was buried. the discover of king tut's tomb also died. the italians called a call to arms to war babies the first time around. when i visited the draft board i noticed my card was filed with a crease at it's corner. farther's laughter was louder than ever. clients who decided to buy had their paintings shipped to houses in the country. i noticed lucie hiding bags of sugar in the closet wh
. over 60,000 of them have happened since the fall of the soviet union but recently very have become a political football. officials point to the cases of 19 children who have died after being adopted by americans. the issue caught fire in 2010 when this boy was put on a plane alone by his adopted mother. the majority of russians support the ban but it's also sparked outrage among many who say this is playing politics with children. the griffins meanwhile are holding out for a miracle. >> you hope that it's not a door shut but just -- that it's just a hurdle, a delay, we simply don't know. >> reporter: abc news. >> and now, maryland's most accurate forecast. >> take a look at it. sunset comes early these days no question. current conditions now at the airport 37 degrees. winds are west at 16, been a gusty day with high wind advisories across the area. we continue to see the wind concerns out there though the wind advisory is now -- we are now below that. take a look at the day. tough to find much sun. cloudy for the most part. warm enough to melt off a lot of the leftover slush t
and others say it's personal. since the fall of the soviet union americans adopted more than 60,000 russian children. kayla anderson is one and is now 21 and she was the first baby adopted from moscow ever done by an american family. her biological mother gave her up when she was 21 days old and she came to america in 1992 and says that was a bels -- blessing and has her health a good education and a loving family. >> makes me feel good i have a family here versus if i were there i would be in an orphanage. >> so many loving families that can afor the experience and bring these babies home and give them a lifestyle they wouldn't have if they stayed in the country. >> kayl and her mother aredevastated to learn americanscan no longer adopt russian children. it will happen within the past half-hour slad mir putin made it a a law. >>> the surprise a come got when she pulled up to her house. why this display is one she will never forget. >>> this time of year plenty of people have their yards decked out with holiday lights. >> but there was special arrangement you have to see because this caught
it did work. it becomes harder many on many as compared with one-on-one. the u.s. and the soviet union became quite experienced in how to handle mutually assured destruction if you like. or mutual deterrents. when you have a number of -- many nations butting up against each other physically essentially, and with much less experience in handling the issue of deterrents, i think the risks become higher. and if as you suggest proliferation is likely to become more widespread, if iran actually gets nuclear capability, i think the risks are very high. i'm rather pessimistic because it does seem to me that one way or another, a local nuclear war could break out and has a fairly high probability of breaking out. and when it happens, if it happens, the destruction will be very great. i'm a -- rather pessimistic about that. but i see a rather tarnished silver lining and because i think if that happens, then the major powers will step in and actually try to undo proliferation. i'm not sure that would be a very happy world because i think that it would be strong pressures for the big five. the fi
to give a jolt to the soviet union. >> stephen: we were going to nuke the moon and we didn't! (laughter) this is earth-shattering news. when it should have been moon shattering news. clearly this, this moment is when america stepped back from greatness. oh, let's see, what's the best way to send the rescu rescue-- russ keyes a message. a tense u.s. security council meeting, no, you light up the goddamn moon way nuclear haloso bright kruschev can read pravda at midnight. (cheers and applause) >> stephen: oh, and what milk toast nancy pants pussied out on our nuclear lunar program? eisenhower. sure, ike beat the nazis but what about the moon nazies? oh, they don't exist? that's just what moon hitler wants you to believe. instead, instead we chose lunar appeasement. and it is just emboldened the moon. i swear last week that thing was half the size. this nation, i say this nation must nuke the moon before it can acquire nuclear weapons of its own. and don't think it isn't trying because we know it is teamed up with fundamentalist islam. (laughter) folks, if you ask me, you shouldn't be aski
to be -- history of dealing with the soviet union, particularly in the 1980s, when you see a very aggressive advocacy. there was a set of sanctions you can introduce which has to do with human rights abuses. more can be done with the u.n. representative who is not allowed to go into iran, and not allowed to go into turkey, there is a sizable number of the iranian population who lives in turkey, having left rain. do think we have to have some degree of modesty in approaching this issue because there some limitations on the ability of the united states and the international community to effectively alter the behavior of the iranian regime which has such determination. you can introduce sanctions. more should be done about advocacy on behalf of the iran ians which are imprisoned and the regime seems to be sense tonight to that ebuick. in the-door sensitive to that rebuke. the europeans would advocate the penal system in iran. all those thinks can work with the arms control approach, and the arms control approach is likely to be predominant. that's the reality of the situation, simply because ev
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